GSP
Quick Navigator

Search Site

Unix VPS
A - Starter
B - Basic
C - Preferred
D - Commercial
MPS - Dedicated
Previous VPSs
* Sign Up! *

Support
Contact Us
Online Help
Handbooks
Domain Status
Man Pages

FAQ
Virtual Servers
Pricing
Billing
Technical

Network
Facilities
Connectivity
Topology Map

Miscellaneous
Server Agreement
Year 2038
Credits
 

USA Flag

 

 

Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  HCOPY (1)

NAME

hcopy - copy files from or to an HFS volume

CONTENTS

Synopsis
Description
Notes
See Also
Author

SYNOPSIS

hcopy [-m|-b|-t|-r|-a] source-path [...] target-path

DESCRIPTION

hcopy transfers files from an HFS volume to UNIX or vice versa. The named source files are copied to the named destination target, which must be a directory if multiple files are to be copied.

Copies are performed using a translation mode, which must be one of:
-m MacBinary II: A popular format for binary file transfer. Both forks of the Macintosh file are preserved. This is the recommended mode for transferring arbitrary Macintosh files.
-b BinHex: An alternative format for ASCII file transfer. Both forks of the Macintosh file are preserved.
-t Text: Performs end-of-line translation. Only the data fork of the Macintosh file is copied.
-r Raw Data: Performs no translation. Only the data fork of the Macintosh file is copied.
-a Automatic: A mode will be chosen automatically for each file based on a set of predefined heuristics.
If no mode is specified, -a is assumed.

If a UNIX source pathname is specified as a single dash (-), hcopy will copy from standard input to the HFS destination. Likewise, a single dash used as a UNIX destination pathname will cause hcopy to copy the HFS source to standard output.

NOTES

Copied files may have their filenames altered during translation. For example, an appropriate file extension may be added or removed, and certain other characters may also be transliterated.

The destination target must not be ambiguous; that is, it must be obvious whether the target is on the UNIX filesystem or on an HFS volume. As a rule, HFS targets must contain at least one colon (:), usually as the beginning of a relative pathname or by itself to represent the current working directory. To make a UNIX target unambiguous, either use an absolute pathname or precede a relative pathname with a dot and slash (./).

SEE ALSO

hfsutils(1), hls(1), hattrib(1)

AUTHOR

Robert Leslie <rob@mars.org>
Search for    or go to Top of page |  Section 1 |  Main Index


HFSUTILS HCOPY (1) 13-Jan-1997

Powered by GSP Visit the GSP FreeBSD Man Page Interface.
Output converted with manServer 1.07.