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Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  PT-SUMMARY (1)

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NAME

pt-summary - Summarize system information nicely.

CONTENTS

SYNOPSIS

Usage: pt-summary

pt-summary conveniently summarizes the status and configuration of a server. It is not a tuning tool or diagnosis tool. It produces a report that is easy to diff and can be pasted into emails without losing the formatting. This tool works well on many types of Unix systems.

Download and run:



   wget http://percona.com/get/pt-summary
   bash ./pt-summary



RISKS

Percona Toolkit is mature, proven in the real world, and well tested, but all database tools can pose a risk to the system and the database server. Before using this tool, please:
o Read the tool’s documentation
o Review the tool’s known BUGS
o Test the tool on a non-production server
o Backup your production server and verify the backups

DESCRIPTION

pt-summary runs a large variety of commands to inspect system status and configuration, saves the output into files in a temporary directory, and then runs Unix commands on these results to format them nicely. It works best when executed as a privileged user, but will also work without privileges, although some output might not be possible to generate without root.

OUTPUT

Many of the outputs from this tool are deliberately rounded to show their magnitude but not the exact detail. This is called fuzzy-rounding. The idea is that it doesn’t matter whether a particular counter is 918 or 921; such a small variation is insignificant, and only makes the output hard to compare to other servers. Fuzzy-rounding rounds in larger increments as the input grows. It begins by rounding to the nearest 5, then the nearest 10, nearest 25, and then repeats by a factor of 10 larger (50, 100, 250), and so on, as the input grows.

The following is a simple report generated from a CentOS virtual machine, broken into sections with commentary following each section. Some long lines are reformatted for clarity when reading this documentation as a manual page in a terminal.



 # Percona Toolkit System Summary Report ######################
         Date | 2012-03-30 00:58:07 UTC (local TZ: EDT -0400)
     Hostname | localhost.localdomain
       Uptime | 20:58:06 up 1 day, 20 min, 1 user,
                load average: 0.14, 0.18, 0.18
       System | innotek GmbH; VirtualBox; v1.2 ()
  Service Tag | 0
     Platform | Linux
      Release | CentOS release 5.5 (Final)
       Kernel | 2.6.18-194.el5
 Architecture | CPU = 32-bit, OS = 32-bit
    Threading | NPTL 2.5
     Compiler | GNU CC version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-48).
      SELinux | Enforcing
  Virtualized | VirtualBox



This section shows the current date and time, and a synopsis of the server and operating system.



 # Processor ##################################################
   Processors | physical = 1, cores = 0, virtual = 1, hyperthreading = no
       Speeds | 1x2510.626
       Models | 1xIntel(R) Core(TM) i5-2400S CPU @ 2.50GHz
       Caches | 1x6144 KB



This section is derived from /proc/cpuinfo.



 # Memory #####################################################
        Total | 503.2M
         Free | 29.0M
         Used | physical = 474.2M, swap allocated = 1.0M,
                swap used = 16.0k, virtual = 474.3M
      Buffers | 33.9M
       Caches | 262.6M
        Dirty | 396 kB
      UsedRSS | 201.9M
   Swappiness | 60
  DirtyPolicy | 40, 10
  Locator  Size  Speed    Form Factor  Type    Type Detail
  =======  ====  =====    ===========  ====    ===========



Information about memory is gathered from free. The Used statistic is the total of the rss sizes displayed by ps. The Dirty statistic for the cached value comes from /proc/meminfo. On Linux, the swappiness settings are gathered from sysctl. The final portion of this section is a table of the DIMMs, which comes from dmidecode. In this example there is no output.



 # Mounted Filesystems ########################################
   Filesystem                       Size Used Type  Opts Mountpoint
   /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00   15G  17% ext3  rw   /
   /dev/sda1                         99M  13% ext3  rw   /boot
   tmpfs                            252M   0% tmpfs rw   /dev/shm



The mounted filesystem section is a combination of information from mount and df. This section is skipped if you disable --summarize-mounts.



 # Disk Schedulers And Queue Size #############################
         dm-0 | UNREADABLE
         dm-1 | UNREADABLE
          hdc | [cfq] 128
          md0 | UNREADABLE
          sda | [cfq] 128



The disk scheduler information is extracted from the /sys filesystem in Linux.



 # Disk Partioning ############################################
 Device       Type      Start        End               Size
 ============ ==== ========== ========== ==================
 /dev/sda     Disk                              17179869184
 /dev/sda1    Part          1         13           98703360
 /dev/sda2    Part         14       2088        17059230720



Information about disk partitioning comes from fdisk -l.



 # Kernel Inode State #########################################
 dentry-state | 10697 8559  45 0  0  0
      file-nr | 960   0  50539
     inode-nr | 14059 8139



These lines are from the files of the same name in the /proc/sys/fs directory on Linux. Read the proc man page to learn about the meaning of these files on your system.



 # LVM Volumes ################################################
 LV       VG         Attr   LSize   Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert
 LogVol00 VolGroup00 -wi-ao 269.00G                                     
 LogVol01 VolGroup00 -wi-ao   9.75G



This section shows the output of lvs.



 # RAID Controller ############################################
   Controller | No RAID controller detected



The tool can detect a variety of RAID controllers by examining lspci and dmesg information. If the controller software is installed on the system, in many cases it is able to execute status commands and show a summary of the RAID controller’s status and configuration. If your system is not supported, please file a bug report.



 # Network Config #############################################
   Controller | Intel Corporation 82540EM Gigabit Ethernet Controller
  FIN Timeout | 60
   Port Range | 61000



The network controllers attached to the system are detected from lspci. The TCP/IP protocol configuration parameters are extracted from sysctl. You can skip this section by disabling the --summarize-network option.



 # Interface Statistics #######################################
 interface rx_bytes rx_packets rx_errors tx_bytes tx_packets tx_errors
 ========= ======== ========== ========= ======== ========== =========
 lo        60000000      12500         0 60000000      12500         0
 eth0      15000000      80000         0  1500000      10000         0
 sit0             0          0         0        0          0         0



Interface statistics are gathered from ip -s link and are fuzzy-rounded. The columns are received and transmitted bytes, packets, and errors. You can skip this section by disabling the --summarize-network option.



 # Network Connections ########################################
   Connections from remote IP addresses
     127.0.0.1           2
   Connections to local IP addresses
     127.0.0.1           2
   Connections to top 10 local ports
     38346               1
     60875               1
   States of connections
     ESTABLISHED         5
     LISTEN              8



This section shows a summary of network connections, retrieved from netstat and fuzzy-rounded to make them easier to compare when the numbers grow large. There are two sub-sections showing how many connections there are per origin and destination IP address, and a sub-section showing the count of ports in use. The section ends with the count of the network connections’ states. You can skip this section by disabling the --summarize-network option.



 # Top Processes ##############################################
   PID USER  PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
     1 root  15   0  2072  628  540 S  0.0  0.1   0:02.55 init
     2 root  RT  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 migration/0
     3 root  34  19     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.03 ksoftirqd/0
     4 root  RT  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 watchdog/0
     5 root  10  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.97 events/0
     6 root  10  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 khelper
     7 root  10  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kthread
    10 root  10  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.13 kblockd/0
    11 root  20  -5     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kacpid
 # Notable Processes ##########################################
   PID    OOM    COMMAND
  2028    +0    sshd



This section shows the first few lines of top so that you can see what processes are actively using CPU time. The notable processes include the SSH daemon and any process whose out-of-memory-killer priority is set to 17. You can skip this section by disabling the --summarize-processes option.



 # Simplified and fuzzy rounded vmstat (wait please) ##########
   procs  ---swap-- -----io---- ---system---- --------cpu--------
    r  b    si   so    bi    bo     ir     cs  us  sy  il  wa  st
    2  0     0    0     3    15     30    125   0   0  99   0   0
    0  0     0    0     0     0   1250    800   6  10  84   0   0
    0  0     0    0     0     0   1000    125   0   0 100   0   0
    0  0     0    0     0     0   1000    125   0   0 100   0   0
    0  0     0    0     0   450   1000    125   0   1  88  11   0
 # The End ####################################################



This section is a trimmed-down sample of vmstat 1 5, so you can see the general status of the system at present. The values in the table are fuzzy-rounded, except for the CPU columns. You can skip this section by disabling the --summarize-processes option.

OPTIONS

--config type: string

Read this comma-separated list of config files. If specified, this must be the first option on the command line.

--help Print help and exit.
--read-samples type: string

Create a report from the files in this directory.

--save-samples type: string

Save the collected data in this directory.

--sleep type: int; default: 5

How long to sleep when gathering samples from vmstat.

--summarize-mounts default: yes; negatable: yes

Report on mounted filesystems and disk usage.

--summarize-network default: yes; negatable: yes

Report on network controllers and configuration.

--summarize-processes default: yes; negatable: yes

Report on top processes and vmstat output.

--version Print tool’s version and exit.

ENVIRONMENT

This tool does not use any environment variables.

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

This tool requires the Bourne shell (/bin/sh).

BUGS

For a list of known bugs, see <http://www.percona.com/bugs/pt-summary>.

Please report bugs at <https://bugs.launchpad.net/percona-toolkit>. Include the following information in your bug report:
o Complete command-line used to run the tool
o Tool --version
o MySQL version of all servers involved
o Output from the tool including STDERR
o Input files (log/dump/config files, etc.)
If possible, include debugging output by running the tool with PTDEBUG; see ENVIRONMENT.

DOWNLOADING

Visit <http://www.percona.com/software/percona-toolkit/> to download the latest release of Percona Toolkit. Or, get the latest release from the command line:



   wget percona.com/get/percona-toolkit.tar.gz

   wget percona.com/get/percona-toolkit.rpm

   wget percona.com/get/percona-toolkit.deb



You can also get individual tools from the latest release:



   wget percona.com/get/TOOL



Replace TOOL with the name of any tool.

AUTHORS

Baron Schwartz, Kevin van Zonneveld, and Brian Fraser

ABOUT PERCONA TOOLKIT

This tool is part of Percona Toolkit, a collection of advanced command-line tools for MySQL developed by Percona. Percona Toolkit was forked from two projects in June, 2011: Maatkit and Aspersa. Those projects were created by Baron Schwartz and primarily developed by him and Daniel Nichter. Visit <http://www.percona.com/software/> to learn about other free, open-source software from Percona.

COPYRIGHT, LICENSE, AND WARRANTY

This program is copyright 2011-2015 Percona LLC and/or its affiliates, 2010-2011 Baron Schwartz.

THIS PROGRAM IS PROVIDED AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, version 2; OR the Perl Artistic License. On UNIX and similar systems, you can issue ‘man perlgpl’ or ‘man perlartistic’ to read these licenses.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA.

VERSION

pt-summary 2.2.14
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