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Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  RESWRAP-17 (1)

NAME

reswrap - wrap icon and image resources into C or C++ code

CONTENTS

Synopsis
Description
Options
Caveats
Author
Copyright
See Also

SYNOPSIS

reswrap [options] [-o[a] outfile] files...

DESCRIPTION

Reswrap is a tool to turn images, text, and other resource files into C or C++ data arrays. This allows various binary resources to be embedded in source code and compiled into an application.

In development of graphical applications with FOX, it is used to embed icons and images for the user interface into the executable and eliminate the need to distribute separate icon and image files.

Reswrap is typically invoked as a part of the build process to generate C++ source files from a collection of icons and images and other binary resources.

By default reswrap will interpret the files listed as a stream of raw bytes and output them as an initialized data array to stdout.

OPTIONS

-?, --help Print summary usage information of all the supported options.

-v, --version
  Print the version number and license information.

-h, --header
  Generate an output file containing only declarations suitable for including as a header file. This also enables the --extern option automatically.

-s, --source
  Generate an output file containing data arrays. This option disables the --extern option. This option is the default when no directives are given.

-V, --verbose
  Print a list of the filenames, and the corresponding resource declarations generated as reswrap processes the resource files.

-i file, --include file
  Generate a #include "file" directive in the output file, to make the declarations available when compiling the data source file.

-o file, --output file
  Write the output of the conversion into file instead of writing to stdout.

-oa file, --append file
  Append the output of the conversion to file instead of writing to stdout. If file does not exist yet, it is created, and the optional comment line will be written, followed by the optional #include "file" directive. If the file already exists then it will be opened for appending.

-e, --extern
  Places the storage modifier extern in front of the data array, ensuring that the data array can be linked with other compilation units. Normally, constant declarations are not visible in other compilation units. This option is automatically turned on when --header is passed.

-S, --static
  Places the storage modifier static in front of the data array. This makes the symbols invisible outside the compilation unit.

-z, --size Output the size of the resource in the declaration of a resource-array. This allows the sizeof() operator to return the correct size of the resource even for external declarations. Note that in text mode, (--text or --ascii options), an extra byte is added to the size for the end of string character.

-d, --decimal
  Write data as decimal numbers instead of using the default hexadecimal numbers.

-x, --hex Write data as hexadecimal numbers. This option is the default.

-t, --text Write data as a text string, with each byte represented as a hexadecimal excape sequence, as in "\x33". The C++ compiler appends a nul-character at the end of the text string, thus making the data array one character longer than the resource file.

-ta, --ascii
  Write data as a text string, with each byte printed normally unless it must be escaped, as in "\x33". Use this option if you need to embed large chunks of text (for example, on-line help) into the application. This lets you keep the original text in a plain text file, and obviates the need to manually escape special characters to embed them into source code. The C++ compiler appends a nul-character at the end of the text string, thus making the data array one character longer than the resource file.

With the --ascii option, printable ascii characters are passed unescaped, while special characters like tabs and newlines are given the usual escape codes.

-k, --keep-ext
  This option causes reswrap to keep the file extension, replacing the "." with an underscore "_". For example, image.gif generates const unsigned char image_gif[].

This option is recommended as it reduces errors when using the data arrays.

-nk, --drop-ext
  This option causes the declaration to be based only on the basename of the resource file. For example, image.gif generates const unsigned char image[].

-m, --msdos Read files with MS-DOS mode. This replaces "\r\n" with "\n" when reading the resource file. Only use this if the resource is actually text!

-b, --binary
  Read files in BINARY mode. Data other than text should always be read in using binary mode. This option is the default.

-u, --unsigned
  Generate unsigned char declaration, even when --text or --ascii was specified.

-N, --no-const
  Do not generate const declarations.

-C, --const Force generation of const declarations.

-cc, --comments
  Add comments to the output files. This option is the default. At the top of each output file, write the current date, and the reswrap version number.

-nc, --no-comments
  Suppress generations of comments in the output files.

-p name, --prefix name
  Prepend the given prefix in front of the name of the resource; this may be used to generate class names or namespace names in front of symbols.

-f name, --suffix name
  Prepend the given prefix in front of the name of the resource; this may be used to generate class names or namespace names in front of symbols.

-n name, --namespace name
  Generate all declarations inside the given C++ namespace declaration. Using a namespace may be used to ensure that declarations are only accessible within the given scope, and thus won’t clash with symbols.

-c cols, --columns cols
  Writes cols columns instead of the default number of columns in the data statements generated by reswrap. The default number of columns for decimal and hex printout is 16 characters; the default for text string printout is 80 characters.

-r name, --resource name
  Instead of using a resource name based on the filename, reswrap substitutes name for the resource name used in the declaration or definition for the following resource file. This is useful if the filename can not be used as an identifier, for example if the filename happens to be a reserved word in C or C++, like "while.gif".

CAVEATS

When using the text string mode, please remember the C compiler appends one nul-character after the string, making the data array one element longer than the resource file.

AUTHOR

This manpage was originally written by Torsten Landschoff (torsten@debian.org) for the Debian distribution of the FOX Toolkit, and is currently maintained by Jeroen van der Zijp (jeroen@fox-toolkit.com).

COPYRIGHT

Copyright © 1997,2014 Jeroen van der Zijp.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions. There is NO warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

SEE ALSO

The reswrap program is a part of the FOX GUI Toolkit. Further information about reswrap can be found at:

http://www.fox-toolkit.org

The FOX Toolkit website includes detailed information about reswrap and its use.

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The FOX C++ GUI Toolkit RESWRAP (1) June 2014

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