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Manual Reference Pages  -  DATETIME::FORMAT::SQLITE (3)

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NAME

DateTime::Format::SQLite - Parse and format SQLite dates and times

CONTENTS

SYNOPSIS



  use DateTime::Format::SQLite;

  my $dt = DateTime::Format::SQLite->parse_datetime( 2003-01-16 23:12:01 );

  # 2003-01-16 23:12:01
  DateTime::Format::SQLite->format_datetime($dt);



DESCRIPTION

This module understands the formats used by SQLite for its date, datetime and time functions. It can be used to parse these formats in order to create DateTime objects, and it can take a DateTime object and produce a timestring accepted by SQLite.

<B>NOTE:B> SQLite does not have real date/time types but stores everything as strings. This module deals with the date/time strings as understood/returned by SQLite’s date, time, datetime, julianday and strftime SQL functions. You will usually want to store your dates in one of these formats.

METHODS

This class offers the methods listed below. All of the parsing methods set the returned DateTime object’s time zone to the <B>UTCB> zone because SQLite does always uses UTC for date calculations. This means your dates may seem to be one day off if you convert them to local time.
o parse_datetime($string)

Given a $string representing a date, this method will return a new DateTime object.

The $string may be in any of the formats understood by SQLite’s date, time, datetime, julianday and strftime SQL functions or it may be in the format returned by these functions (except strftime, of course).

The time zone for this object will always be in UTC because SQLite assumes UTC for all date calculations.

If $string contains no date, the parser assumes 2000-01-01 (just like SQLite).

If given an improperly formatted string, this method may die.

o parse_date($string)
o parse_time($string)
o parse_julianday($string)

These are aliases for parse_datetime, for symmetry with format_* functions.

o format_date($datetime)

Given a DateTime object, this methods returnes a string in the format YYYY-MM-DD, i.e. in the same format SQLite’s date function uses.

o format_time($datetime)

Given a DateTime object, this methods returnes a string in the format HH:MM:SS, i.e. in the same format SQLite’s time function uses.

o format_datetime($datetime)

Given a DateTime object, this methods returnes a string in the format YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS, i.e. in the same format SQLite’s datetime function uses.

o format_julianday($datetime)

Given a DateTime object, this methods returnes a string in the format DDDDDDDDDD, i.e. in the same format SQLite’s julianday function uses.

AUTHOR

Claus Faerber <CFAERBER@cpan.org>

based on DateTime::Format::MySQL by David Rolsky.

Copyright X 2008 Claus Faerber.

Copyright X 2003 David Rolsky.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

The full text of the license can be found in the LICENSE file included with this module.

SEE ALSO

http://datetime.perl.org/

http://www.sqlite.org/lang_datefunc.html

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perl v5.20.3 DATETIME::FORMAT::SQLITE (3) 2009-12-10

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