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Manual Reference Pages  -  POE::COMPONENT::SERVER::IRC::PLUGIN (3)

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NAME

POE::Component::Server::IRC::Plugin - Provides plugin documentation for POE::Component::Server::IRC.

CONTENTS

DESCRIPTION

This is the document coders/users should refer to when using/developing plugins for POE::Component::Server::IRC.

The plugin system works by letting coders hook into aspects of POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend. More details are found in the docs for Object::Pluggable.

The general architecture of using the plugins should be:



 # Import the stuff...
 use POE;
 use POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend;
 use POE::Component::Server::IRC::Plugin::ExamplePlugin;

 # Create our session here
 POE::Session->create( ... );

 # Create the IRC session here
 my $irc = POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend->spawn() or die Nooo!;

 # Create the plugin
 # Of course it could be something like $plugin = MyPlugin->new();
 my $plugin = POE::Component::Server::IRC::Plugin::ExamplePlugin->new( ... );

 # Hook it up!
 $irc->plugin_add( ExamplePlugin, $plugin );

 # OOPS, we lost the plugin object!
 my $pluginobj = $irc->plugin_get( ExamplePlugin );

 # We want a list of plugins and objects
 my $hashref = $irc->plugin_list();

 # Oh! We want a list of plugin aliases.
 my @aliases = keys %{ $irc->plugin_list() };

 # Ah, we want to remove the plugin
 $plugin = $irc->plugin_del( ExamplePlugin );



The plugins themselves will conform to the standard API described here. What they can do is limited only by imagination and the IRC RFC’s ;)



 package POE::Component::Server::IRC::ExamplePlugin;

 # Import the constants
 use POE::Component::Server::IRC::Plugin qw( :ALL );

 # Our constructor
 sub new {
     # ...
 }

 # Required entry point for POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend
 sub PCSI_register {
     my ($self, $irc) = @_;
         # Register events we are interested in
         $irc->plugin_register( $self, SERVER, qw(connection) );

         # Return success
         return 1;
     }

     # Required exit point for PoCo-Server-IRC
     sub PCSI_unregister {
         my ($self, $irc) = @_;

         # PCSIB will automatically unregister events for the plugin

         # Do some cleanup...

         # Return success
         return 1;
     }

     # Registered events will be sent to methods starting with IRC_
     # If the plugin registered for SERVER - irc_355
     sub IRCD_connection {
         my ($self, $irc, $line) = @_;

         # Remember, we receive pointers to scalars, so we can modify them
         $$line = frobnicate!;

         # Return an exit code
         return PCSI_EAT_NONE;
     }

     # Default handler for events that do not have a corresponding
     # plugin method defined.
     sub _default {
         my ($self, $irc, $event) = splice @_, 0, 3;

         print "Default called for $event\n";

         # Return an exit code
         return PCSI_EAT_NONE;
     }



    Pipeline

The plugins are given priority on a first come, first serve basis. Therefore, plugins that were added before others have the first shot at processing events. See Object::Pluggable::Pipeline for details.



 my $pipeline = $ircd->pipeline();



EVENTS

    SERVER hooks

Hooks that are targeted toward data received from the server will get the exact same arguments as if it was a normal event, look at the POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend docs for more information.

<B>Note:B> Server methods are identified in the plugin namespace by the subroutine prefix of IRCD_*. I.e. an ircd_cmd_kick event handler would be:



 sub IRCD_cmd_kick {}



The only difference is instead of getting scalars, the hook will get a reference to the scalar, to allow it to mangle the data. This allows the plugin to modify data *before* they are sent out to registered sessions.

They are required to return one of the exit codes so POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend will know what to do.

Names of potential hooks:



 socketerr
 connected
 plugin_del
 ...



Keep in mind that they are always lowercased, check out the POE::Component::Server::IRC documentation.

CW_default

If a plugin doesn’t have a specific hook method defined for an event, the component will attempt to call a plugin’s _default method. The first parameter after the plugin and irc objects will be the handler name.



 sub _default {
     my ($self, $irc, $event) = splice @_, 0, 3;
     return PCSI_EAT_NONE;
 }



The _default handler is expected to return one of the exit codes so POE::Component::Server::IRC::Backend will know what to do.

EXPORTS

The following constants are exported on demand.

CWPCSI_EAT_NONE

This means the event will continue to be processed by remaining plugins and finally, sent to interested sessions that registered for it.

CWPCSI_EAT_CLIENT

This means the event will continue to be processed by remaining plugins but it will not be sent to any sessions that registered for it.

CWPCSI_EAT_PLUGIN

This means the event will not be processed by remaining plugins, it will go straight to interested sessions.

CWPCSI_EAT_ALL

This means the event will be completely discarded, no plugin or session will see it.

SEE ALSO

Object::Pluggable
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perl v5.20.3 POE::COMPONENT::SERVER::IRC::PLUGIN (3) 2011-11-25

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