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Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  PERLBAL::MANUAL::WEBSERVER (3)

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NAME

Perlbal::Manual::WebServer - Configuring Perlbal as a Web Server

    VERSION

Perlbal 1.78.

    DESCRIPTION

How to configure a Perlbal Web Server service.

    READ ME FIRST

Please read Perlbal::Manual::Configuration first for a better explanation on how to configure Perlbal. This document will make much more sense after reading that.

    Configuring Perlbal as a Web Server

By default, perlbal looks for a configuration file at /etc/perlbal/perlbal.conf.

You can also point perlbal at a different configuration file with the <B>-cB> flag.



    $ perlbal -c /home/user/perlbal.conf



Here’s a very simple example where we configure a simple web server that serves an index file under /tmp



    CREATE SERVICE perlbal_test
        SET role           = web_server
        SET listen         = 0.0.0.0:80
        SET docroot        = /tmp
    ENABLE perlbal_test



The first line creates a service called perlbal_test. The last line enables that service.

The three parameters state - in order - that the service is a web server, that it listens on all addresses on port 80, and that its document root is /tmp.

    Parameters

You can set parameters via commands of either forms:



    SET <service-name> <param> = <value>
    SET <param> = <value>



<B>dirindexingB> = bool Show directory indexes when an HTTP request is for a directory. Warning: this is not an async operation, so will slow down Perlbal on heavily loaded sites.

Default if false.

<B>docrootB> = directory/root Directory root for web server.
<B>enable_concatenate_getB> = bool Enable Perlbal’s multiple-files-in-one-request mode, where a client have use a comma-separated list of files to return, always in text/plain.

Useful for web apps which have dozens/hundreds of tiny css/js files, and don’t trust browsers/etc to do pipelining.

Decreases overall round-trip latency a bunch, but requires app to be modified to support it. See t/17-concat.t test for details.

Default is false.

<B>enable_md5B> = bool Enable verification of the Content-MD5 header in HTTP PUT requests.

Default is true.

<B>enable_deleteB> = bool Enable HTTP DELETE requests.

Default is false.

<B>enable_putB> = bool Enable HTTP PUT requests.

Default is false.

<B>index_filesB> = comma-separated list of filenames Comma-separated list of filenames to load when a user visits a directory URL, listed in order of preference.

Default is index.html.

<B>max_put_sizeB> = size The maximum content-length that will be accepted for a PUT request, if enable_put is on.

Default is 0, which means there is no limit.

<B>min_put_directoryB> = int If PUT requests are enabled, require this many levels of directories to already exist. If not, fail.

Default is 0.

<B>server_tokensB> = bool Whether to provide a Server header.

Perlbal by default adds a header to all replies (such as the web_server role). By setting this default to off, you can prevent Perlbal from identifying itself.

Default is on.

    SEE ALSO

Perlbal::Manual::Configuration, Perlbal::Manual::Management.
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