GSP
Quick Navigator

Search Site

Unix VPS
A - Starter
B - Basic
C - Preferred
D - Commercial
MPS - Dedicated
Previous VPSs
* Sign Up! *

Support
Contact Us
Online Help
Handbooks
Domain Status
Man Pages

FAQ
Virtual Servers
Pricing
Billing
Technical

Network
Facilities
Connectivity
Topology Map

Miscellaneous
Server Agreement
Year 2038
Credits
 

USA Flag

 

 

Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  STRING::FORMATTER::COOKBOOK (3)

.ds Aq ’

NAME

String::Formatter::Cookbook - ways to put String::Formatter to use

CONTENTS

VERSION

version 0.102084

OVERVIEW

String::Formatter is a pretty simple system for building formatting routines, but it can be hard to get started without an idea of the sort of things that are possible.

BASIC RECIPES

    constants only

The simplest stringf interface you can provide is one that just formats constant strings, allowing the user to put them inside other fixed strings with alignment:



  use String::Formatter stringf => {
    input_processor => forbid_input,
    codes => {
      a => apples,
      b => bananas,
      w => watermelon,
    },
  };

  print stringf(I eat %a and %b but never %w.);

  # Output:
  # I eat apples and bananas but never watermelon.



If the user tries to parameterize the string by passing arguments after the format string, an exception will be raised.

    sprintf-like conversions

Another common pattern is to create a routine that behaves like Perl’s sprintf, but with a different set of conversion routines. (It will also almost certainly have much simpler semantics than Perl’s wildly complex behavior.)



  use String::Formatter stringf => {
    codes => {
      s => sub { $_ },     # string itself
      l => sub { length }, # length of input string
      e => sub { /[^\x00-\x7F]/ ? 8bit : 7bit }, # ascii-safeness
    },
  };

  print stringf(
    "My name is %s.  I am about %l feet tall.  I use an %e alphabet.\n",
    Ricardo,
    ffffff,
    abcchdefghijklllmnnõpqrrrstuvwxyz,
  );

  # Output:
  # My name is Ricardo.  I am about 6 feet tall.  I use an 8bit alphabet.



<B>WarningB>: The behavior of positional string replacement when the conversion codes mix constant strings and code references is currently poorly nailed-down. Do not rely on it yet.

    named conversions

This recipe acts a bit like Python’s format operator when given a dictionary. Rather than matching format code position with input ordering, inputs can be chosen by name.



  use String::Formatter stringf => {
    input_processor => require_named_input,
    string_replacer => named_replace,

    codes => {
      s => sub { $_ },     # string itself
      l => sub { length }, # length of input string
      e => sub { /[^\x00-\x7F]/ ? 8bit : 7bit }, # ascii-safeness
    },
  };

  print stringf(
    "My %{which}s name is %{name}s.  My name is %{name}l letters long.",
    {
      which => first,
      name  => Marvin,
    },
  );

  # Output:
  # My first name is Marvin.  My name is 6 letters long.



Because this is a useful recipe, there is a shorthand for it:



  use String::Formatter named_stringf => {
    codes => {
      s => sub { $_ },     # string itself
      l => sub { length }, # length of input string
      e => sub { /[^\x00-\x7F]/ ? 8bit : 7bit }, # ascii-safeness
    },
  };



    method calls

Some objects provide methods to stringify them flexibly. For example, many objects that represent timestamps allow you to call strftime or something similar. The method_replace string replacer comes in handy here:



  use String::Formatter stringf => {
    input_processor => require_single_input,
    string_replacer => method_replace,

    codes => {
      f => strftime,
      c => format_cldr,
      s => sub { "$_[0]" },
    },
  };

  print stringf(
    "%{%Y-%m-%d}f is also %{yyyy-MM-dd}c.  Default string is %s.",
    DateTime->now,
  );

  # Output:
  # 2009-11-17 is also 2009-11-17.  Default string is 2009-11-17T15:35:11.



This recipe is available as the export method_stringf:



  use String::Formatter method_stringf => {
    codes => {
      f => strftime,
      c => format_cldr,
      s => sub { "$_[0]" },
    },
  };



You can easily use this to implement an actual stringf-like method:



  package MyClass;

  use String::Formatter method_stringf => {
    -as => _stringf,
    codes => {
      f => strftime,
      c => format_cldr,
      s => sub { "$_[0]" },
    },
  };

  sub format {
    my ($self, $format) = @_;
    return _stringf($format, $self);
  }



AUTHORS

o Ricardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>
o Darren Chamberlain <darren@cpan.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

This software is Copyright (c) 2013 by Ricardo Signes <rjbs@cpan.org>.

This is free software, licensed under:



  The GNU General Public License, Version 2, June 1991



Search for    or go to Top of page |  Section 3 |  Main Index


perl v5.20.3 STRING::FORMATTER::COOKBOOK (3) 2013-11-09

Powered by GSP Visit the GSP FreeBSD Man Page Interface.
Output converted with manServer 1.07.