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Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  SEAHAVEN (6)

NAME

Seahaven Towers - A solitaire game

CONTENTS

Synopsis
Description
Rules For Seahaven Towers
Playing Seahaven
Scoring
Command Line Options
Bugs
Copyright
Authors

SYNOPSIS

seahaven [-display display:number] [-speed num]

DESCRIPTION

seahaven is an X implementation of a solitaire game sometimes known as Seahaven Towers, which I originally saw as a shareware game for the Macintosh. seahaven is a fairly blatent rip-off of that game.

RULES FOR SEAHAVEN TOWERS

The game is played using an ordinary deck of cards. The cards are all face-up; you always know where all of the cards are. At any time, each card is in one of three kinds of stacks:

- Playing stacks. There are ten of these, each initially having five cards.

- Working stacks. There are four of these, two of them initially having a card in them. Each working stack is allowed to contain at most one card.

- Ace stacks. There are four of these, one for each suit. They are initially empty. Cards must be placed in these stacks in ascending order, starting with the ace. The object of the game is to get all the cards in the ace stacks.

The rules are simple. You may only move one card at a time; only a card in a working stack or on the top of a playing stack may be moved. A card may be moved to the top of a playing stack only if it is the same suit that was on top there and the next lower card. (In other words, you may only place the seven of spades on top of the eight of spades.) A card may be moved to any empty working stack. And a card may be moved to an ace stack if it is an ace or if it is the next higher card than the one that is already there.

PLAYING SEAHAVEN

To move a card, just drag it with the left mouse button. When you let go, it will be placed on the stack that the card was moved closest to, if such a move is legal. If the move is not legal, the card will spring back to its original location.

Since it is always to your advantage to move cards to the ace stacks as soon as possible, cards will be automatically moved there for you.

There is also a convenient shortcut: you may move several cards at once from one playing stack to another, providing that such a move would be possible using available empty work stacks.

To help you locate cards, if you press the middle button on a card, the next lower card of the same suit will be highlighted. If you press the right button, the next higher card will be highlighted.

Since there is no hidden information in the game, it’s not quite cheating to provide undo commands. There are Undo and Redo buttons at the bottom of the window; you may also use the U and R keys. The Restart button will restore you back to the original set-up.

If you give up, you can press the Autoplay button. The computer will figure out whether there’s a solution. If there is, you can review the computer’s solution by using the Restart and Redo buttons. This counts as a loss (unless you’ve already won the hand). If there isn’t a solution then you win the game.

SCORING

If you get all the cards into the ace piles, you will be scored a win. If you press the New Game button or the Autoplay button without having won, you will be scored a loss. Your wins and losses will be remembered across invocations of seahaven.

COMMAND LINE OPTIONS

The -speed flag changes the speed of the animation. The higher the number, the faster cards will move when automatically transferred to the ace piles. The default value is 30.

BUGS

Needs an icon.

Does not look at any resources at all. That is, your .Xdefaults file will be ignored.

Lots of the code is horrid.

This man page is poorly written.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright 1991 by Terry Weissman and Charles Haynes.

Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation for any purpose and without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and that both that copyright notice and this permission notice appear in supporting documentation, and that the names of Terry Weissman or Charles Haynes or their employers not be used in advertising or publicity pertaining to distribution of the software without specific, written prior permission. Terry Weissman and Charles Haynes make no representations about the suitability of this software for any purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty.

TERRY WEISSMAN AND CHARLES HAYNES AND THEIR EMPLOYERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE, INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS, IN NO EVENT SHALL THEY BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

So there.

AUTHORS

Terry Weissman
Silicon Graphics, Incorporated
weissman@sgi.com

Auto-play code by

Charles Haynes
Western Software Laboratory
Digital Equipment Corporation
haynes@wsl.dec.com

Card drawing code by

Bill Spitzak <spitzak@d2.com>

Additional code by

Warner Losh <imp@village.org>

Card images from "spider" game:

Copyright (c) 1990 by David Lemke & Network Computing Devices, Inc.
(lemke@ncd.com)

Copyright 1990 Heather Rose and Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Copyright (c) 1989, Donald R. Woods and Sun Microsystems, Inc.

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