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Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  ICPLD (1)

NAME

icpld - Internet Connection Performance Logging Daemon

CONTENTS

SYNOPSIS

icpld -ip <ip> [OPTIONS]

or

icpld -ip6 <ip> [OPTIONS]

alternatively a mixture of both

DESCRIPTION

icpld forks into the background and checks for downtime in a network connection.

You can set it to try against any ip, either on the internet, or on your local network in different intervals. As from version 0.6.0 icpld also supports IPv6 addresses.

ICPLD can monitor two connection at once, one IPv4 connection, and an IPv6 one. You can also limit the use to one connection only, by not specifying an ip. If you only want to monitor an IPv6 connection, you simply do not specify an IPv4 ip. In case you have both an IPv4 and an IPv6 ip specified in the configuration file, you may override this by specifying the -4 or the -6 switch. Giving one of these tells icpld to only monitor this. Hence -6 only monitors an IPv6 connection, even though there is an IPv4 ip specified in the configuration file.

As the name implies, icpld writes a log as it is running. This logfile is by default located in ~/.icpld and is called ’log’. If you want to specify another location for your logfile, you can do this by either edit the post logFile in the configuration file, or specify one using the -logfile option. Normally, when you monitor two connections, they are both logged into this default file, but you can however specify a special log file for your IPv6 connection, using the -logfile6 switch.

See below for more options

OPTIONS

Note that some of these options are only available when
icpld has been compiled with IPv6 support.
-h, --help Shows the help section and exits -ip This switch is required unless there is an IPv6 address specified, and decides which ip ICPLD will probe for ICMP replies
-ip6 This specifies which IPv6 ip icpld will probe for ICMP replies. This is optional unless the -6 switch is used. Note that the use of one, does not exclude the other. In other words; you can monitor both an IPv6 and an IPv4 connection with the same icpld process
-fbip Fallback ip. This is the ip ICPLD will double check against if the ip specified with -ip is not responding
-fbip6 Same as fbip, but for the IPv6 monitoring.
-detach Giving this argument to icpld will daemonize a process that is currently running in the foreground. Useful if you want to monitor icpld for a while, and then fork it without having to restart icpld and "pollute" the log files
-6 This option will tell icpld to use IPv6 only. Mainly used to ignore IPv4 entries in the configuration file
-4 This option is used to ignore IPv6 entries in the configuration file
-nd Prevent ICPLD from daemonizing
-d Force ICPLD to damonize (this is default, but can be used to override a configuration file setting)
-s Silent. Produces no output what so ever. Has no effect in combination with -nd (naturally)
-m This option is only useful in combination with -logfile at which point -m tells icpld to output the whole logfile at once, without breaks. Virtually the same as cat ~/.icpld/log
-status Shows the current state of icpld and the connection
-log Displays the performance log
-turn
  Turns the log file over. Old one is saved as ~/.icpld/log.n where n is the next available number. A stamp is put in the new log, telling you when it was turned
-reset
  Resets ICPLD state and log and quit a current ICPLD process
-quit
  Terminates a running ICPLD process. Use this at all times, rather than sending signals manually
-interval
  Sets the interval in which ICPLD will check for an available connection (default 10 seconds)
-dinterval
  Sets the interval with which icpld will check for an available connection, once it has been marked as unavailable. Will override -interval in case of downtime. The default is 6 seconds
-pint Tells icpld how frequent it should send ICMP-packets once it is in a checking cycle. This option is equivalent to ping -i <double> and should not be confused with -interval Default is one packet per second
-nobeep Do not generate a beep when the connection comes back up (beeping is only activated when combined with the -nd switch)
-logfile Specifies which logfile to use rather than the default ~/.icpld/log Note that this has an impact on -log as well as -turn, if you use icpld with different -log options. A log which is located in another place than what -logfile says, will not be turned.
-logfile6
  Same as above, but for the IPv6 log. Note that the same file can be used for both connections.
-htmlfile
  ICPLD can, if you want, duplicate the log file into HTML format. This switch tells ICPLD where to put the html output.
-htmlfile6
  Same as above, but for the duplication of the IPv6 log either specified by -logfile6 or within the configuration file
-errfile This option tells icpld where to save the log which contains the output of ping. The output is only written if the ping failed. This is useful for debugging since you can not only see when the connection was broken, but also what caused the downtime.
-errfile6
  Same as the above, but for the IPv6 connection
-err Displays the contents of the errors file (default: ~/.icpld/errors)
-err6 Same as the above, but for the IPv6 errors file
-config Specifies which config file to use. The default is /usr/local/etc/icpld.conf Usage of the config file at all is optional as ICPLD can be operated throughoutly by command line as well.
-iface Specifies which source interface or (on some platforms) address to use for the checking
-v, --version
  Display version info and exits

CONFIG FILE

ICPLD automatically looks for a configuration file in /usr/local/etc/icpld.conf If none is to be found, it will use the command line arguments, hence the configuration file is not necessary, but may be handy and helpful.

The location of the config file may be altered by supplying the -config switch at command line.

Note that all command line arguments overrides the values in the configuration file.

Available config options:


.Sp
ip This is the target machine, which we will try to establish contact with
Example: ip=192.168.0.1
ip6 This is the target machine, which we will check an IPv6 connection against.
Example: ip6=3ffe::1
fbip Fallback ip. ICPLD will double check the connection status if the first ip is not responding, by probing this ip Example: ip=192.168.0.2
fbip6 Same as above, but for the IPv6 connection monitoring
Example: fbip6=3ffe::2
interval
  Will determine how often we will check for response from the machine specified with ip. The unit is seconds
Example: interval=10
dinterval
  Determines how often we will check for an available connection after it has been marked as unavailable. The unit is seconds
Example: dinterval=5
pint Tells icpld how frequent it should send ICMP-packets once it is in a checking cycle. This option is equivalent to ping -i <double> and should not be confused with -interval Default is one packet per second.
Example: pint=1.2
iface Specifies which interface or (on some platforms) address to use for the checking. This is optional, and if excluded or left blank, the kernel default will be used. This only is useful for determining which trunk is down if you are on a multi-connected system. logFile Specifies the location of the log file we will be stamping.
Example: logFile=~/.icpld/log
logFile6
  Same as above, but for the IPv6 log. Note that this option may be set identicaly to logFile
Example: logFile6=~/.icpld/log
htmlFile
  Same as logFile, but the HTML formatted log.
Example: htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld.html
htmlFile6
  Same as above, but the IPv6 log duplication. Note that this may be set identicaly to the htmlFile option
Example: htmlFile6=~/public_html/icpld.html
daemonize
  ICPLD will either stay in the foreground, or fork to the background depending on the value of daemonize. daemonize is of boolean type, meaning it is either ’true’ or ’false’.
Example: daemonize=false
nobeep If ICPLD is active in the foreground, it will generate a beep once the connection is back up after downtime. To disable this, set nobeep to true. nobeep is of boolean type, meaning it is either ’true’ or ’false’
Example: nobeep=true
cmd4dn This is a system command which will be executed whenever the IPv4 connection drops. This can be useful when you wish to be alerted whenever your connection goes down.
cmd4up Same as above, but when the connection comes back up from downtime
cmd6dn This is the same as cmd4dn but for the IPv6 connection
cmd6up Same as cmd4up but for the IPv6 connection
errfile
  This option tells icpld where to save the log which contains the output of ping. The output is only written if the ping failed.
errfile6
  Same as the above, but for the IPv6 connection
Example of a valid and acceptable configuration file
  for users which does not have an IPv6 connection to monitor :

# ICPLD config file (/etc/icpld.conf)

ip=192.168.0.1

fbip=192.168.0.2

interval=9

dinterval=5

pint=1.0

daemonize=true

logFile=~/.icpld/log

htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld.html

errfile=~/.icpld/errors

nobeep=false

cmd4dn=play ~/mysounds/awwww.wav

cmd4up=play ~/mysounds/yipee.wav

Example of a valid configuration file for
  monitoring both an IPv4 and an IPv6 connection:

ip=192.168.0.1

ip6=3ffe::1

fbip=192.168.0.2

fbip6=3ffe::2

interval=9

dinterval=5

pint=1.0

daemonize=true

logFile=~/.icpld/log

logFile6=~/.icpld/log

htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld.html

htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld-v6.html

errfile=~/.icpld/errors

errfile6=~/.icpld/errors

nobeep=false

cmd4dn=play ~/mysounds/awwww.wav

cmd4up=play ~/mysounds/yipee.wav

cmd6dn=play ~/mysounds/awwww.wav

cmd6up=play ~/mysounds/yipee.wav

AUTHOR

Erik Ljungstrom <erik@ibiblio.org>

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Erik Ljungstrom ICPLD (1) 1.1.5

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