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Man Pages


Manual Reference Pages  -  POD::ESCAPES (3)

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NAME

Pod::Escapes - for resolving Pod E<...> sequences

CONTENTS

SYNOPSIS



  use Pod::Escapes qw(e2char);
  ...la la la, parsing POD, la la la...
  $text = e2char($e_node->label);
  unless(defined $text) {
    print "Unknown E sequence \"", $e_node->label, "\"!";
  }
  ...else print/interpolate $text...



DESCRIPTION

This module provides things that are useful in decoding Pod E<...> sequences. Presumably, it should be used only by Pod parsers and/or formatters.

By default, Pod::Escapes exports none of its symbols. But you can request any of them to be exported. Either request them individually, as with use Pod::Escapes qw(symbolname symbolname2...);, or you can do use Pod::Escapes qw(:ALL); to get all exportable symbols.

GOODIES

e2char($e_content) Given a name or number that could appear in a E<name_or_num> sequence, this returns the string that it stands for. For example, e2char(sol), e2char(47), e2char(0x2F), and e2char(057) all return /, because E<sol>, E<47>, E<0x2f>, and E<057>, all mean /. If the name has no known value (as with a name of qacute) or is syntactically invalid (as with a name of 1/4), this returns undef.
e2charnum($e_content) Given a name or number that could appear in a E<name_or_num> sequence, this returns the number of the Unicode character that this stands for. For example, e2char(sol), e2char(47), e2char(0x2F), and e2char(057) all return 47, because E<sol>, E<47>, E<0x2f>, and E<057>, all mean /, whose Unicode number is 47. If the name has no known value (as with a name of qacute) or is syntactically invalid (as with a name of 1/4), this returns undef.
$Name2character{name} Maps from names (as in E<name>) like eacute or sol to the string that each stands for. Note that this does not include numerics (like 64 or x981c). Under old Perl versions (before 5.7) you get a ? in place of characters whose Unicode value is over 255.
$Name2character_number{name} Maps from names (as in E<name>) like eacute or sol to the Unicode value that each stands for. For example, $Name2character_number{eacute} is 201, and $Name2character_number{eacute} is 8364. You get the correct Unicode value, regardless of the version of Perl you’re using — which differs from %Name2character’s behavior under pre-5.7 Perls.

Note that this hash does not include numerics (like 64 or x981c).

$Latin1Code_to_fallback{integer} For numbers in the range 160 (0x00A0) to 255 (0x00FF), this maps from the character code for a Latin-1 character (like 233 for lowercase e-acute) to the US-ASCII character that best aproximates it (like e). You may find this useful if you are rendering POD in a format that you think deals well only with US-ASCII characters.
$Latin1Char_to_fallback{character} Just as above, but maps from characters (like \xE9, lowercase e-acute) to characters (like e).
$Code2USASCII{integer} This maps from US-ASCII codes (like 32) to the corresponding character (like space, for 32). Only characters 32 to 126 are defined. This is meant for use by e2char($x) when it senses that it’s running on a non-ASCII platform (where chr(32) doesn’t get you a space — but $Code2USASCII{32} will). It’s documented here just in case you might find it useful.

CAVEATS

On Perl versions before 5.7, Unicode characters with a value over 255 (like lambda or emdash) can’t be conveyed. This module does work under such early Perl versions, but in the place of each such character, you get a ?. Latin-1 characters (characters 160-255) are unaffected.

Under EBCDIC platforms, e2char($n) may not always be the same as chr(e2charnum($n)), and ditto for $Name2character{$name} and chr($Name2character_number{$name}), because the strings are returned as native, and the numbers are returned as Unicode. However, for Perls starting with v5.8, e2char($n) is the same as chr(utf8::unicode_to_native(e2charnum($n))), and ditto for $Name2character{$name} and chr(utf8::unicode_to_native($Name2character_number{$name})).

SEE ALSO

Pod::Browser - a pod web server based on Catalyst.

Pod::Checker - check pod documents for syntax errors.

Pod::Coverage - check if the documentation for a module is comprehensive.

perlpod - description of pod format (for people documenting with pod).

perlpodspec - specification of pod format (for people processing it).

Text::Unidecode - ASCII transliteration of Unicode text.

REPOSITORY

<https://github.com/neilbowers/Pod-Escapes>

COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMERS

Copyright (c) 2001-2004 Sean M. Burke. All rights reserved.

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Portions of the data tables in this module are derived from the entity declarations in the W3C XHTML specification.

Currently (October 2001), that’s these three:



 http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml-lat1.ent
 http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml-special.ent
 http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml-symbol.ent



AUTHOR

Sean M. Burke sburke@cpan.org

Now being maintained by Neil Bowers <neilb@cpan.org>

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perl v5.20.3 POD::ESCAPES (3) 2014-12-09

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