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Markapl(3) User Contributed Perl Documentation Markapl(3)
 

Markapl - Markup as Perl

This document describes Markapl version 0.08

    package MyView;
    use Markapl;
    template '/a/page.html' => sub {
        h1("#title") { "Hi" };
        p(".first") { "In the begining, lorem ipsum...." };
        p(style => "color: red;") { "But...." };
    }
    package main;
    my $output = MyView->render("/a/page.html");

Here's a short guide how to use this module. You can skip this tutorial section if you're already using Template::Declare, since it's exactly the same.
First of all, you need a sole package for defining your templates, let's call it "MyView" in the example. Then you "use Markapl" (but not use base), which installs many helper subroutines into your "MyView" package for declaring and rendering templates:
    package MyView;
    use Markapl;
To define a template, use "template" function like this:
    template '/page.html' => sub {
        h1("#title") { "Hi" };
        p(".first") { "In the begining, lorem ipsum...." };
        p(style => "color: red;") { "But...." };
    }
To render it, call "render" function:
    my $out = MyView->render("/page.html");
Besides these two functions, "Markapl" also exports about another 120 tag functions that are named after HTML tags, for exapmle, h1, h2, h3, div, p, and span. Almost all HTML tags are defined as a function.
In your template, if you say:
    h1 { "Hi" };
It'll be rendered as:
    <h1>Hi</h1>
The block after "h1" is an anonymous sub-routine, and the return value of which will become the content of the "h1" tag.
If you want to add attributes to the tag, do it like this:
    div(id => "example", class => "lipsum") { "Lorem ipsum" };
Alternatively, you can use CSS selector syntax to quickly defined id and class attribute:
    div("#example") { "Lorem ipsum" };
That only works when the attribute list contain exactly one string inside.
A special function "outs" need to be used to concatenate strings with inline elements:
    p {
        outs "Hello, ";
        a(href => "/users/gugod") { "gugod" };
    }

This is a new try to use Devel::Declare to change the Perl5 language. It learns pretty much everything from Template::Declare, and has similar interface. With only one difference: how element attributes are defined.
In Template::Declare, it goes like:
    h1 {
        id is "title";
        outs "Hi";
    };
In here, it is:
    h1(id => "title") { "Hi" };
Or a shorthand for "id" attribute:
    h1("#title") { "Hi" };
However, there are conflict between HTML tag names and perl builtin function / ops, and the behaviour of which cannot (and better not) be altered by Markapl:
    link map q s sub tr
To generate markup with these tags, and "html_" prefix to them, for instance:
    html_q { "I a quotation, but this tag is not supported by IE." }
It'll produce:
    <q>I a quotation, but this tag is not supported by IE.</q>
For tables, since there's absolutely no way to clobber "tr" in Perl AFAIK (not without using source filter,) tr and td are both renamed to row and cell, correspondly:
    table {
      row {
        cell { "gugod" };
        cell { "170cm" };
        cell { "100kg" };
      }
    }
It actually makes more sense. This idea is borrowed from Template::Declare
Several helper methods are defined in Markapl::Helpers. Read the documentation there too.
Smoe HTML5 tags allow value-less attributes like:
    <script async src="foo.js"></script>
To generate those, pass <undef> as the attribute value:
    script(src => "foo.js", async => undef);

template($name, $code);
Defines a template.
render($name)
You need to call it as class method like,
   MyView->render("/foo.html");
    
Or
   render MyView, "/foo.html";
    
If you happen to like this style.
Doesn't support template variables yet. Stay tuned.
outs($str);
Should only be used inside a template body. It appends $str to current output buffer frame.
set($name, $value)
Store a value under given name in your view package stash. Should be used as a class method like:
    MyView->set(title => "Greeting");
    
Think of it is assigning values to global template variables. $name must be a string and $value can be any scalar. It could be a reference to other structured data.
get($name)
Retriving a named value from the view package stash. This should only be used in template as a function call, like:
    template 'index.html' => sub {
        h1 { get("title") }
    }
    
If you call it as a class method, it will still work:
    MyView->get("title")
    

"Devel::Declare"

No bugs have been reported.
Please report any bugs or feature requests to "bug-markapl@rt.cpan.org", or through the web interface at <http://rt.cpan.org>.

Kang-min Liu "<gugod@gugod.org>"

Copyright (c) 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Kang-min Liu "<gugod@gugod.org>".
This is free software, licensed under:
    The MIT (X11) License

BECAUSE THIS SOFTWARE IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE SOFTWARE, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE SOFTWARE "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE SOFTWARE IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE SOFTWARE PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR, OR CORRECTION.
IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE SOFTWARE AS PERMITTED BY THE ABOVE LICENCE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE SOFTWARE TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER SOFTWARE), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
2012-01-16 perl v5.28.1

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